No One Has Succeeded In Capturing This 3,200-Year-Old Tree In One Image Before – Until Now

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California’s redwood forests are well-known for the enormous community of trees present there. One of them really stands majestic.

It’s the third largest redwood tree in terms of volume and is situated on the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

Locals address this magnificent tree as “The President.”

Even though “The President” was unable to mark itself as the world’s tallest tree, the height of it was measured as 247 feet (75 m).

The tree is the third largest in the world at 45, 0000 cubic feet that is the size of 127,800 cartons of milk.

The most interesting part about this tree is its age.

According to the biologists, “The President” is about 3,200 years old.

This was given its name after the American president Warren G. Harding in 1923.

“The President” is still growing at a very high speed.

The biological studies revealed that this giant tree adds a cubic meter of wood to its mass annually.

However, none of the scientists were able to capture this tree in one image earlier.

But a team from National Geographic was successful in completing this great mission.

The final image was created by the combination of images that they took from different angles. The team used wires to climb this gigantic redwood tree.

It has taken almost 32 days for the completion of the image and the total amount of pictures that were used in this process was 126.

The result was amazing!

Watch the following video to get to know how the team managed to climb and take these perfect shots:

Nature is exactly a wonderful creator and sometimes offers up things that are so amazing. Nature makes us gasp in awe.

One such example is “The President” and it has given us a chance to re-think about the importance of conserving land and our forests.

We wish this tree to last for more than another 3,000 years. What’s your idea about this giant creature? Share the article and join the conversation.

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